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Graduate research at the Nunez Lab

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Thank you for your interest in pursuing graduate studies at UVM biology and our lab. Please be aware that applications for the Ph.D. program are due by December 15. Thus, make sure to contact Dr. Nunez and/or other UVM faculty months in advance to discuss graduate opportunities and whether we have a good research match.

Things to consider (for prospective PhD students):

What do we mean by a good "research match"? In this lab, we greatly enjoy interdisciplinary research in the fields of population, statistical, and evolutionary genomics. Dr. Nunez will be happy to mentor you in projects seeking to understand fundamental aspects of rapid evolution in the wild (e.g., adaptations to seasonality or intertidal zonation), demographic inference as well as molecular evolution using flies, barnacles, sea urchins, and the like. If these topics excite you, then the lab will probably be a good match for you. Yet, it is important to note that working on these questions will be demanding and it will require you to develop and sharpen robust statistics and computational skills, mastery of  the primary literature, as well as a lot of fortitude and doggedness to complete challenging multi-year projects!

Why do you want a graduate degree? It is very important for any and all people who want to pursue PhDs to work on developing a professional vision. A vision is not a plan set in stone, since your own plans and outlook on life will change while you are here, but at least a fundamental understanding of why you want a PhD/Masters. For example, tenure track positions at research universities are highly competitive, and it may take a long time before an opportunity that makes sense for you materializes. This is an important thing to be aware of as you chart your professional vision. Also, while positions in industry and government are more abundant, they often require particular sets of skills which one must purposely develop while in graduate school. So you have to ask yourself: What sort of position do you ultimately want, and what skills will you need to achieve that? 

UVM has a phenomenal biology program. The UVM graduate program in biology is vibrant and you will have many opportunities to network and collaborate across other university units such as:

 

UVM biology will provide you with multiple opportunities to collaborate within the fly, barnacle, and urchin systems: Most labs in our department work on unique fundamental questions. Yet, there are plenty of opportunities for co-mentorships to develop multi-disciplinary projects. For example:

  • The Pespeni lab, works on ecological genomics of marine organisms in the context of climate change.

  • The Lockwood lab studies thermal physiology and functional genomics of fruit flies and marine systems

  • The Vigoreaux lab works on fly muscle physiology.

  • The Stanley lab studies the neurobiology of feeding behavior in flies.

  • And many more: check out the faculty

Working in my lab will allow to build collaborations with a global consortium: We actively collaborate with members of the international consortium DrosEU (The European consortium of Drosophila genomics). And we make regular contributions to the global DEST dataset. There are multiple collaborative projects that can emanate from this work.

To start the process:

1. Make contact. Please send Dr. Nunez and email with ALL of the following information to jnunez2 [at] uvm.edu:

  • Your name, major, and graduation date (or expected date).

  • Your most up-to date transcript.

  • A full CV

  • A description of why you would like to pursue a PhD or Masters in the lab and at UVM.

  • Is there a particular aspect of our work that interests you?

2.  Follow up with Dr. Nunez. Sometimes life gets very busy. So if you don't hear from Dr. Nunez in about a week, feel free to send a quick follow up.

3. An interview will take place in which we will discuss shared research interest, and potential next steps to prepare your application. During this interview Dr. Nunez, will ask you the following questions:

  1. Describe your research interests and why they are a good match for the lab?

  2. What are the most significant developments in population genetics in the last 5 years or so?

  3. How would you describe the most interesting insight from your past research, to a non-scientist?

  4. Describe your favorite paper from the primary literature and why?

  5. What does equity, diversity, inclusion, and justice mean to you and what are the ways in which you would contribute to the diversity of perspectives and lived experiences represented in the lab?

  6. Do you have a question for us, at this stage, about the department or program?

Find the UVM application instructions in this link

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